Sunday, May 31, 2009

Ubuntu : Automount NTFS Drive

For my Ubuntu (9.04), automount ntfs drive don't come out-of-box. It might have been happening for many versions but I didn't notice.

This automount have made some problem to me. For instance, my Rhythmbox Library. Because my musics file was keeping in ntfs drive, so everytime the system was boot the library was error because the drive hadn't mounted. So I want automount very much.

I think I might have fixed it for my 8.04. For 8.10, I used synaptic upgrade from 8.04 so it might still have the configuration from 8.04.

The issue was happended again when I have a clean installation with Jaunty Jackalope.

After some googling, there are many ways to fix this issue but it's too many things to do than I think it should be. Such as fix fstab blah blah. With a great community, there must be easy way to do this.

And now I have found it. Easy one

credit from Joeb454 : HowTo: Automount NTFS Drives

You can follow this link to tg/showthread.php?t=785263he solution or see the summarization for myself below.
  • Install ntfs-config (via apt-get)
  • Unmount wanted drive (if it had mounted)
  • Open it (somewhere in menus or run with command line)
  • Choose drive(s)
  • Enable Write Support for Internal Drives
That's all! After you boot up your system again, you drive will be automounted.

4 comments:

Kevin said...

thanks, man.
this was very helpful.
I really didn't want to mess with the fstab anymore.

theregoesmyeye said...

You are amazing.

I was looking forever for this since i'm not familiar with fstab. Thanks alot for posting this.

FSP Publisher said...

This was a timely article as I had a hard time with syncing my work to SpiderOak since all the work was on an ntfs drive. Less than two minutes I was up and running.

Shiki said...

Thanks! Worked for me as well (Ubuntu Karmic). This'll make it easier to work in an Ubuntu/windows dual-boot setup.

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